KNOW YOUR US CONSTITUTION? MORE STATES LOOK TO TEACH IT

[4/3/17]  Should U.S. high school students know at least as much about the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Federalist papers as immigrants passing an American citizenship test?

In a growing number of school systems, having such a basic knowledge is now a graduation requirement. But states are taking different approaches to combating what’s seen as a widespread lack of knowledge about how government works.

Kentucky last week and Arkansas on March 16 became the latest of more than a dozen states since 2015 that have required the high school social studies curriculum to include material covered by the 100 questions asked on the naturalization exam. Lawmakers in other states, including Minnesota, are hoping to foster even deeper understanding of the fundamentals of American democracy by adding a full course to study its most important documents.

“Rights might be inherent, but ideas need to be taught,” said Maida Buckley, a retired classroom teacher in Fairbanks, Alaska, who testified last year to an Alaskan legislative task force on civics education. “When you have a system of government that’s based on ideas, espoused in the Declaration of Independence and carried out with a working document in the Constitution, those ideas need to be taught.”


For almost a decade Gov't Slaves has worked tirelessly to bring its readers the most critical news the corporate media does not want you to see. We have no intrusive ads, pop-ups or clickbait, just NEWS. If you happen to be in a position to support our work, PLEASE consider making a one-time donation below or a monthly recurring donation HERE. Your support is humbly appreciated. Gov't Slaves


100% Secure via Pay Pal. All major CC accepted.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $5.00