Concerned about Bitcoin security? Try this

It happened again. Last week, hackers stole 4,700 Bitcoins (over $80 million at today’s price) from mining marketplace NiceHash.

(The company pairs up people with spare computing power with others who are willing to pay to use that capacity to mine Bitcoin– and then announced they would reimburse users who lost money from the hack.)

On top of that, last month hackers stole $31 million of another cryptocurrency called Tether.

But those are only two recent attacks.

Remember Mt. Gox?

The Bitcoin exchange was founded 2010. By 2013, it was handling around 80% of all Bitcoin transactions.

Then the company halted all trading after “technical issues” caused 850,000 Bitcoins to go missing.

Those missing coins are worth over $15 billion at today’s price.

All of the crypto theft making people question the security of Bitcoin and other digital currencies.

But it’s important to remember, in these cases, “Bitcoin” didn’t get hacked… it was the exchanges or marketplaces that got hacked.

This happens almost every day; people unwittingly get their phones and emails hacked and end up losing their cryptocurrency in the process.

It reminds me of the early days of the Internet, back when WiFi was still a new thing and banks were just starting to provide online account access.

Back then, hacks were commonplace. Users didn’t know enough about wireless network security, and banks didn’t have SSL enabled… so hackers could easily ‘sniff’ data packets and steal bank login details.

Fast forward 10-15 years and all of that’s changed.

Most people at this point (hopefully) know how to secure their WiFi networks with WPA2 security or better, and banks employ much better security and encryption standards.

But with cryptocurrencies it’s still very Wild West out there, vastly increasing the chances of hacks, cracks, and theft.

You’d be amazed, for example, how many people use a ridiculously unsecure password like “123456” for a website login that stores their Bitcoin secret key.

And even if hackers don’t steal your crypto, there’s still a chance you’ll lose it.

A friend of mine bought some Bitcoin in 2010 and stored it on a laptop. Then he threw the laptop away… along with all the Bitcoin. And there’s no way to get it back.

Like just about anything, all it takes is a little bit of education to prevent a major disaster from occurring.

One approach I encourage you to learn about for storing crypto is called “cold storage.”


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