32-MEMBER SWAT TEAM RAIDS HOME BECAUSE MAN HAD REGISTERED GUN

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[10/13/16]  A SWAT team with 32 officers, an armored vehicle and a sniper raided a man’s home because he had a license to carry a gun and a registered weapon — and because a former roommate had a little bit of marijuana.

During the search – which was criticized by a judge this month — deputies smashed Michael Delgado’s door and windows, and tossed flash-bang grenades into his house.

Worst of all, Delgado was not the target of the raid or even suspected of a crime. Deputies from the Hennepin County Emergency Services Unit (ESU) were actually searching for Walter Power. Power; who was wanted for selling marijuana, was believed to be staying at Delgado’s house in Golden Valley, Minnesota, in November 2015.

The ESU was called in because Delgado had a gun registered to his name and a license to carry it, and they feared he would use it, The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported.

Unconstitutional Raid

The military-style tactics police used in the raid violated the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution, Hennepin County District Judge Tanya Bransford ruled. The Fourth Amendment bans unreasonable searches and seizures.

Bransford compared the search to a 1992 case in which police raided a man’s home, blindfolded him and asked him questions without reading him his Miranda rights, the newspaper reported.

“[But] the militarized actions in [the Power] case were far more extreme,” Bransford wrote.

Bransford suppressed evidence found in the case, which forced the county attorney to drop charges against Power.

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