WA Farmers Block Federal Drones And Agenda 21 -





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WA Farmers Block Federal Drones And Agenda 21





(Mikael Thalen)  The Washington State Farm Bureau just convened its 93rd annual convention.

Started in 1920, The WSFB is a voluntary, grassroots advocacy organization representing the social and economic interests of local farm and ranch families.

Every year the WSFB’s volunteer leaders from across the state get together to discuss issues and adopt new policy. The WSFB is unique in that its members, delegates from each of the 25 county Farm Bureaus, adopt the policies, ranging from land use to fiscal issues.

This year’s convention was especially exciting due to the passage of new policy, set to put a barrier against the overreach of the federal government and even foreign ones.

“This year we indeed adopted a policy opposing all aspects of UN Agenda 21 as well as a policy opposing the use of drones (unmanned aerial vehicles) to spy on farms without express permission from the landowner,” said John Stuhlmiller, Director of Government Relations.

“As an Okanogan County Farm Bureau member, I am personally very excited about the new policies that were passed. The issues facing Okanogan County today can all be tied back toAgenda 21 at some level – whether it be land acquisitions, wolves, or salmon recovery,” said Pamela Leslie.

She also noted that, “Drones are of great concern as well. Drones are being used around the country to spy on farmers and ranchers, as well as average citizens. By adopting these new policies, the Washington State Farm Bureau has sent a strong message that it will aid Okanogan County in our grassroots movement to fight this kind of tyranny.”



 


An Environmental Protection Agency project entitled Landscape Characterization and Change Detection Methods Development Research, says the EPA will use Department of Defense and NASA designed “UAV and satellite based remote sensor data to provide a continuous environmental monitoring capability.” Many don’t buy the government’s claim of using drones to protect the environment, especially after the recently discovered Air Force intelligence briefthat states, if drones “accidentally” capture surveillance footage of Americans, the data can be stored and analyzed by the Pentagon for up to 90 days.

Farmers nationwide were upset when it was learned that the EPA was spying on Cattle Ranchers in Iowa and Nebraska. Seattle residents were also up in arms after the Seattle Police Department received a drone.

Alabama made news when they adopted a law protecting due process and private property by prohibiting any government involvement with or participation in Agenda 21. Washington farmers now join the ranks of citizens nationwide moving to protect their constitutional rights.

The text of the policy changes are as follows:

New Policy – Agenda 21 (add to Section VIII – Forestry and Public Lands)

We oppose the United Nations Agenda 21 and the ratification or implementation of any or all of its components.

The UAV policy is:

180 – Right of Entry for Government Agents
The Constitution requires government agents to obtain a search warrant before entering private property. The Constitution further requires that the search warrant contain a specific description of the property to be searched. The Constitution applies to any government agent who enters farms or ranches in order to conduct an inspection.

We believe government agents must ask permission of the owner or the owner’s authorized representative prior to entering a farm or ranch for purposes of conducting an inspection. If permission is denied, the agent should obtain a search warrant that specifies the reason for the inspection. The agent should inform the owner/agent that they have the legal right to ask that a search warrant be obtained prior to an inspection. Agents should not retaliate against citizens who exercise this Constitutional right.

We believe government agents may enter property without the owner’s permission only if an emergency exists that constitutes an immediate threat to human life.

We oppose the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) to conduct aerial inspections of farms and ranches unless explicit permission has been granted by the landowner. (2002, amended 2012)