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Goldman CEO’s Former Assistant Commits Suicide After Confessing To $1.2 Million Wine Theft

A former assistant to Goldman Sachs CEO John Solomon committed suicide on Tuesday, the day he was expected to plead guilty in federal court to stealing more than $1 million of rare wine from his former boss, according to Bloomberg. Nicolas De-Meyer, 41, jumped from his 33rd-floor room at the Carlyle Hotel on Manhattan’s east side at 2:30 pm Tuesday, around the time he had been expected to appear in court to enter his guilty plea for interstate transportation transportation of stolen property in connection with a theft after he admitting to stealing $1.2 million in fine wine.

De-Meyer was accused of stealing hundreds of bottles from Solomon, who was named Mr. Gourmet in 2010 by the Society of Bacchus America. The theft included seven bottles of one of the rarest and priciest vintages in the world. Solomon is known to have a 1,000 bottle wine storage facility in his residence.

The stolen wines included seven bottles from the French estate Domaine de la Romanee-Conti, a Burgundy widely considered “among the best, most expensive and rarest wines in the world,” which had been previously purchased for $133,650, according to the indictment.

Solomon and his wife issued a statement expressing their profound regret over De-Meyer’s death, saying he had been “close” with the family for many years.

“Mary and I are deeply saddened to hear that Nicolas took his own life,” Solomon said in a statement through Goldman Sachs, referring to his wife. “He was close to our family for several years, and we are all heartbroken to hear of his tragic end.”

De-Meyer was employed by Solomon between 2008 and late 2016, when the theft was uncovered. he was accused of stealing hundreds of bottles, including bottles of DRC, a top Burgundy. The seven bottles of DRC that were stolen had previously been purchased for $133,650.

De-Meyer’s duties in his work for the Solomon’s included picking up shipments of wine and transporting it from Solomon’s Manhattan apartment to his cellar in East Hampton. De-Meyer eventually decided to use the alias Mark Miller to sell bottles to a North Carolina-based wine dealer. After discovering the theft in November 2016, Solomon confronted De Meyer, who quickly confessed and promised to pay Solomon back. However, he soon fled the country and over the following 14 months traveled to Rome, Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires before returning to the US, where he was arrested earlier this year after landing at LAX. He spent the next two months in federal custody before his mother pledged her home to put up his $1 million cash bond.

Prosecutors and De-Meyer’s lawyers had been waiting at the courthouse for De-Meyer to show up and enter his guilty plea when they first learned of his suicide.